Missing out on the daffodils … for the second time …

I started this post more than two weeks ago but I just could not find the time to finish it. However, with the uncooperative weather that has not allowed me to spend much time on the balcony for the past few days, I thus had a very good reason to try and finish this post … about our miss-adventure with the daffodils.

So far, the hubby and I have not been as lucky with the daffodils as we have been with their cousin the narcissus. For two years in a row, we have missed catching sight of this cousin of the narcissus in full glorious bloom. Although we even went to the site a few days earlier this year on the erroneous assumption that we would have better luck, we fared even worse than last year … argghh!!! 😦

It was one of the first excursions that we did just a few days after we had come back from Singapore in early April, as we had wanted to be sure that we would see the flowers at the height of their blooming season as we had done with the narcissus. Alas … this was not to be.

Maybe, just like our experience with the Glacier Express, we shall be luckier on our third attempt lah! Unfortunately, unlike the Glacier Express, we shall have to wait until next spring before we can try once again to catch the daffodils in full bloom growing in the wild.

If you are wondering why I am so hung up about wanting to see these wild daffodils, well … maybe the pictures below will give an idea.

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Heading in the direction of the woodlands to hunt for wild daffodils. Unlike the narcissus which grows at higher altitude in open fields and vast meadows, the daffodils seem to have a preference for the moist and shady floor of the lower woodlands.

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And, while it is permissible for visitors to pick a handful of the narcissus to bring home, it is prohibited to pick any daffodils (or jonquilles in French) in this wood.

Maybe this is because whereas the narcissus can be found growing wild in sheer abundance in several areas on the mountain slopes of the Préalpes Vaudoises, the wild daffodils, on the other hand, can only be found in the woodlands situated near the small village of Eclépens.

Fortunately, the hubby spotted this sign just before we entered the woods so that I would be spared from accidentally flouting the cardinal rule!

Here are some photos of our unsuccessful attempt to look for …

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Narcissus pseudonarcissus … or more commonly known as wild daffodils in April this year. These were among the few blooms that were still in perfect condition. Finding them was like finding a prize treasure because, initially, everywhere that we looked that day …

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… was like this! At the height of its blooming season, all along these paths would have been covered in yellow blooms.

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Unfortunately on that day, we only saw stretches of green with some bits of yellow here and there.

It was such a disappointment to realise that although we were there a few days earlier than last year, there was not a lot of beautiful blooms left to be admired! 😦

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These two young ladies were among several others on that day who were also looking for the elusive yellow blooms. If only they had asked me on the whereabouts of the elusive blooms just half an hour later, I could have directed them to an area where there were still some yellow blooms to be found.

I chanced upon the spring beauties as I was looking for the hubby (as we had taken separate paths looking for the wild daffodils). I spotted some yellow blooms on a low hill, after having almost given up all hope of finding any patches of yellow.

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They might no longer be at their best … still, it was nice to be able to see a small sea of yellows, finally! 😀

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Maybe if we had come only a week or two earlier, we might still have been able to catch many of these early spring beauties at the height of their prime, gracing the floor of the woodlands. I was quite disappointed to have missed the spectacle, yet again … haizzz …

Fortunately, we had had a small taste of what we could expect to see and to enjoy when we went to the same woods for the first time last year,

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Okay, okay, most of them were already past their prime … but at least most of the yellow blooms were still on the flower stalks and I could see them as far out as my eyes could span the area!

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Just imagine the whole area covered in lovely yellow blooms. It would have been pretty magnificent, no?

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Hubby in the midst of nearly spent wild daffodils … trying to get that perfect shot of these early spring beauties.

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Such a pity that we were not able to catch these Narcissus pseudonarcissus in full bloom covering the woodlands’ floor because of their short blooming season.

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But … there is always another opportunity …

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… even though we shall have to wait a full year to get another chance to try and see them again!

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But for these beauties … we shall be back, definitely! And we shall try to come even earlier than we did this year. Eerrrr … at least, I hope that we shall remember and be able to do so lah!

Fortunately for us, this special wild daffodil paradise is located not too far away from home so that we know that we can make another visit once their blooming season is underway again.

However, all was not lost on that day lah. Since I did not get to enjoy the yellow flowers which I had come to see … I decided that I might as well try to do something else while we were in the area.

I foraged for a different kind of yellow flower which is edible instead … as well as other spring edibles.

But that, I shall share more in the next post lah. 😉

 

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