Foraging for wild garlic at the parents’ …

I was just sitting down and reading from the Internet that Sunday morning when the mum casually mentioned that she had discovered plenty of wild garlic plants down in the copse. The moment I heard ‘wild garlic’ … my interest was piqued!

I have heard about wild garlic, wild carrots, wild onions … well, basically many edible things that grow in the wild … and I have always wanted to go and forage for them. One of the things that I would lurveee to go and forage in the woods are the mushrooms. The only problem is that it is best to do so with someone who knows these wild edibles well in order to avoid picking and eating the wrong plant, fruits or mushrooms!

Anyway, after hearing that there were plenty of wild garlics at the back of the home, I asked the mum if she could show them to me.

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So down we went to the copse. As I was eager to be imparted my first introduction to wild garlic, I decided to use this staircase to go down the slope as it is faster … but then the mum chose to walk down the slope on the other side. So I had to wait for her lah … haizzz … 🙂

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She pointed out this slope to me … and told me to go there and check out the wild garlic for myself as the slope was a little too steep for her.

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But where and which are the wild garlic plants? All I could see are a lot of green grass-like plants on the slope. Nothing that resembled the garlic plants on my balcony!

Unfortunately, after pointing out the slope the mum then left me to take a walk with the hubby (to tell him what she wanted him to do for her in the copse that Sunday) … so that I could not ask her again to verify which was the correct plant.

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As I had never seen a wild garlic plant before … the only way to find out, I suppose, was to try and dig some plants lah! And since these were the plants that I saw growing aplenty on the slope, I decided to try them first.

Since I did not bring anything with me, I used some twigs to dig out the plants. And true enough … although they might not look like the normal garlic plant that I have at home … the smell of the bulb below the earth was a dead giveaway when I touched it! It smelt of garlic!

So I looked for pictures of wild garlic on the Internet once I was back in the house (I ought to have done so before going down with the mum!) … and true enough, these are wild garlic plants! And from the Internet, I also learnt that one can make pesto from the leaves of the wild garlic and the bulb itself can be pickled if one does not want to cook it. Wonderful!

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So back to the wild garlic grove I went … this time with a small trowel and a used plastic container so that I could try to dig out some to bring back home with me.

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And this is how the wild garlic bulbs look like. Not at all like the usual garlic bulbs … but the pungent smell is the same lah!

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I dug out several of them … both teeny, tiny ones as well as not so tiny ones … and a few still firmly planted in soil (in case the loose ones did not take well to transplanting). I was glad that I had done so because later on I realised that some of the leaves of the wild garlic were already becoming quite limp by the time I was going to put them in a pot.

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While I was helping  the mum and hubby to dig and transplant primrose plantlets in the copse, I came across more of the wild garlic. It was tempting to dig more of them … but since we do not have a copse but only a balcony to plant these wild plants, I decided not to be too greedy. I told myself that, after all, I should be able to pick more when we come to visit the parents again.

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And so borrowing a pot from the mum to plant my stash of wild garlic plants, I brought this small pot home. Not to try and eat them, at least not yet … but to grow them on my balcony. And since my small pot of thyme did not recover from the long and cold winter, I also pinched some cuttings of the mum’s thyme to grow at home!

Hmmm … it is nice not having to buy any pots of herbs from the garden centre as there is already a garden centre at the parents’ should I need a fresh supply of mints, thyme, rosemary, etc, etc! hehehe … 😀

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And the pot of wild garlic (and thyme) staking a place between the pots of chives inside the greenhouse. The greenhouse should provide some shade and protection from the cold spring weather for now until their roots are strong enough to be planted outside. It has been a few days since I brought them home and they seem to be doing well enough … even though they are still sharing that small pot with some thyme 🙂

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Their better known and commercially cultivated cousin growing just outside the greenhouse. They do not look at all alike, do they … even though they smell the same!

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I had noticed what had looked like flower bulbs when I digged some of the bigger plants … and from the Internet I learnt that April to June is the flowering period for wild garlic … oooops! I should have left those with flowering bulbs alone. But as the plants seem to be doing fine in the pot … so maybe the bulbs will continue to grow and even bloom in the small pot!

Anyway, I must try to remember to take some photos of the wild garlic plants when they are in full bloom at the parents’. The profusion of tiny white flowers looked quite beautiful from the photos that I saw on the Internet. And of course, the flowers are edible too! All in all … it is the kind of plant that I lurveeee growing on my balcony … if I succeed to do so, that is! 🙂

Other entry on the parents’ garden in 2013:

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2 thoughts on “Foraging for wild garlic at the parents’ …

  1. Alamak Ros, pokok bawang putih liar tu memang dah ada putik bunga masa I ambil hari tu … bukan sebab I jaga dia sampai berbunga. Sebenarnya selain untuk ambil gambar hari tu, I tak jenguk-jenguk pun pokok tu kat dalam greenhouse sebab asyik hujan aje minggu ni!

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  2. ‘Sejuknya’ tangan you CT, serasi dengan semua tumbuhan….baru tanam je dah nak berbunga.

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